Marketing using an Implied Benefit: Honey Nut Cheerios

Imagine growing up in our house. You are 6 years old. You are just finishing up breakfast. You are just learning to read.  You start practicing your reading on the box of cereal in front of you. You are so excited you have to share your excitement with your mom.

Mom, so this cereal makes you lower your cholesterol.

(Of course, I have to help with the word ko-les-ter-ole.)

Well, not quite honey. You see, they are using an implied benefit in their advertising copy. I know it says that it helps lower your cholesterol, but if you read the fine print, at the bottom of the box, you will see that studies show that any food that has X amount of Y ingredient will lower your cholesterol. And since this product happens to have that amount, they are implying that this product will also reap you this benefit. They are hoping that no one reads that fine print and that they assume that it is only this product that provides you this great benefit.

See here it is. It says “* Three grams of soluble fiber daily from whole grain oat foods, like Honey Nut Cheerios® cereal, in a diet low in saturated fat and cholesterol may reduce the risk of heart disease. Honey Nut Cheerios® cereal has 0.75g per serving.” So, Any food that has soluble fiber from whole grain oats can make the same claim being made by this cereal.

And as a child, you don’t need to care about your cholesterol anyway. It’s only something to be concerned about when you get older. So that statement doesn’t even apply to you.

“oh.”

Way to go mom! Way to pop that bubble! They’ll be no uneducated consumers in this household!

Where in your daily life to  do you stumble across a marketer using an implied benefit in their messages? Have you ever sat up and taken notice? Please share some of your observances with us. I might even share them with my kids 🙂

About Debra Zimmer

After 25 years of growing entrepreneurial businesses at companies such as Microsoft, where she attracted 700,000 members into an online community in 18 months and then grew a second one to 250,000 members in 10 months, Debra Zimmer then struck out on her own to grow an online retail store to 6-figures of income and put it on AUTOPILOT for 3 years. With an engineering degree and an MBA from Columbia Business School, Debra is the undisputed expert in helping experts, entrepreneurs and executives to focus their brilliance and magnify their impact using social media and internet marketing tactics.

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